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  •  Kamrath, C., Rajendran, S., Nenguwo, N., Afari-Sefa, V., Bröring, S. (2018). Adoption behavior of market traders: An analysis based on technology acceptance model and theory of planned behaviour. International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, 21(6): 771-790. Link

  • Sick, N., Bröring, S. (2018). Anticipating Industry Convergence in the Context of Industry 4.0. PICMET '18 Conference, "Managing Technological Entrepreneurship: The Engine for Economic Growth", USA.Related information
  • Carraresi, L., Berg, S., Bröring, S. (2018). Emerging value chains within the bio-economy: structural changes in the case of phosphate. Journal of Cleaner Production, 183: 87-101. Link
  • Baum, C. M., Gross, C. (2017): Developing behavior-informed strategies for climate and sustainability policy.Journal of Bioeconomics Special Issue “Transition to Sustainable Economy” 19(1)53-95.
  • Borge, L., Bröring, S. (2017): Exploring effectiveness of technology transfer in interdisciplinary settings- The case of the bioeconomyCreativity and Innovation Management Journal.
  • Bröring, S., Wensing, J. (2017): Functional Ingredients: Market Research. (forthcoming), in: Kirk-Othmer encyclopedia of chemical technology.
  • Butkowski, O., Pakseresht, A., Lagerkvist, C., Bröring, S. (2017): Debunking the Myth of General Consumer Rejection of Green Genetic Engineering: Empirical Evidence from Germany.International Journal of Consumer Studies.
  • Berg, S., Kircher, M., Preschitschek, N., Bröring, S., Schurr, U. (2017): Die Bioökonomie als Kreislauf und Verbundsystem, in: Pietzsch, J Bioökonomie für Einsteiger141-160Springer Spektrum.
  • Bröring, S., Baum, C. M., Butkowski, O., Kircher, M. (2017): Kriterien für den Erfolg der Bioökonomie., in: In J. Pietszch (Ed.), Bioökonomie für Einsteiger161-177Springer Spektrum.
  • Tiso, T., Thies, S., Müller, M., Tsvetanova, L., Carraresi, L., Bröring, S., Jaeger, K.-E., Blank, L. M. (2017): Rhamnolipids: Production, Performance, and Application, in Consequences of Microbial Interactions with Hydrocarbons, Oils, and Lipids: Production of Fuels and Chemicals (Edited by Sang Yup Lee)1-37Springer International PublishingLink.
 
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InducTomE

Induction of secondary metabolites in tomato by-products for extraction and economic evaluation of the model process

(BOOST FUND Project InducTomE)

 

Plant secondary metabolites are essential components of the human diet, utilised as phytomedicines, as industrial raw materials and high-value fine chemicals. Chemically, secondary metabolites exhibit an enormous diversity and complexity, which makes their industrial chemical synthesis difficult and expensive. Agriculture and horticulture produce large quantities of plant biomass residues as by-products. Plants increase the production of secondary metabolites in response to abiotic and biotic stress. InducTomE project aims to identify abiotic stress treatments to induce the accumulation of two secondary metabolites (rutin and solanesol) in green tomato residues to high amounts (fig. 1). A conceptual process design will be developed for an extraction process and emerging value chains will be evaluated together with their economic feasibility. In addition, co-induced secondary metabolites will be identified and their market entry potential will be evaluated. As a long-term prospect, the developed process concept will be transferable to other waste streams and metabolites, thereby playing a pivotal role in the successful development of a bioeconomy perspective.

 

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Figure1: Interdisciplinary approach to generate added value to horticultural production of tomato

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